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      1 Links
      2 =====
      3 To various things that interest me, *in no particular order*.  I know well some
      4 of the content I like, but you might be much more knowledgeable than me on many
      5 topics I list there.  This is what I aim to discover, not topics I master.
      6 
      7 OpenBSD
      8 -------
      9 "Free, Functionnnal and Secure"
     10 
     11 * <https://www.openbsd.org/>
     12 
     13 FreeBSD
     14 -------
     15 "The Power To Serve"
     16 
     17 * <https://www.freebsd.org/>
     18 
     19 Plan 9
     20 ------
     21 A research operating system.
     22 
     23 * <https://9p.io/plan9/> -
     24   More dead links every days.
     25 
     26 * <https://cat-v.org/> -
     27   The plan 9 doc.
     28 
     29 * <https://fqa.9front.org/dash1.ghostintheminesweepershell.pdf> -
     30   get started with Plan 9 through 9front
     31 
     32 * <https://doc.cat-v.org/plan_9/4th_edition/papers/venti/> -
     33   A new approach to archival storage: append only deduplicated blocks.
     34 
     35 * <https://www.ueber.net/who/mjl/plan9/plan9-obsd.html> -
     36   Run a plan 9 network on OpenBSD, helps to understand what is Plan 9.
     37 
     38 * <https://9fans.github.io/plan9port/> -
     39   Run plan 9 user programs on other operating systems.
     40 
     41 * <https://tools.suckless.org/9base/> -
     42   Subset of the programs of plan9port that compiles with musl as well.
     43 
     44 Distributions patches and forks
     45 
     46 * <https://9front.org/> -
     47   Distro to get it to work on its machine.
     48 
     49 * <https://9legacy.org/> -
     50   Distro that is just a set of patches to the original.
     51 
     52 * <https://harvey-os.org/> -
     53   Porting Plan 9 to POSIX.
     54 
     55 * <http://jehanne.io/> -
     56   Porting POSIX to Plan 9.
     57 
     58 xv6
     59 ---
     60 A operating system for teaching operating systems.
     61 
     62 * <https://pdos.csail.mit.edu/6.828/2017/xv6.html> -
     63   Entry point and about page.
     64 
     65 * <git://github.com/mit-pdos/xv6-public.git>
     66   cloneit!
     67 
     68 * <https://pdos.csail.mit.edu/6.828/2017/xv6/book-rev10.pdf> -
     69   I want more time to ReadIt!
     70 
     71 TempleOS
     72 --------
     73 A holy operating system.
     74 
     75 * <https://templeos.org/> -
     76   Support for 3D mesh in assembly without recompiling.  Because we can.
     77 
     78 Linux
     79 -----
     80 A famous operating system.
     81 
     82 * <https://tldp.org/> -
     83   The Linux Documentation Project, mainly Linux but not only.
     84 
     85 Distributions:
     86 
     87 * <https://www.gentoo.org/> -
     88   If you do not compile a binary, it's someone else's binary.
     89 
     90 * <https://www.voidlinux.org/> -
     91   Runit-based ditribution.
     92 
     93 * <https://crux.nu/> -
     94   Lightweight (for *real*, not like Arch) distro.
     95 
     96 * <https://www.slackware.com/> -
     97   A straightforward distro.
     98 
     99 * <http://tinycorelinux.net/> -
    100   Hard to do any smaller.
    101 
    102 Distro that symlink files as a package management system:
    103 
    104 * <https://gobolinux.org/> -
    105   Interesting directory hierarchy, good introduction.
    106 
    107 * <http://sabo.xyz/> -
    108   Very simple and efficient approach.
    109 
    110 GenodeOS
    111 --------
    112 > The Genode OS Framework is a tool kit for building highly secure 
    113 > special-purpose operating systems
    114 
    115 Written in C++ (bleh) but a good way to study how to do a kernel.
    116 
    117 * <https://genode.org/about/index>
    118 
    119 seL4
    120 ----
    121 Considered by some as the "state of the art" microkernel.
    122 
    123 Uses repo (bleh) and cmake (bleh) instead of more portable tools, but is
    124 definitely worth an approach.
    125 
    126 * <https://sel4.systems/>
    127 
    128 Software groups
    129 ---------------
    130 Various groups of people sometimes writing software, sometimes related to other
    131 groups, sometimes collaborating, sometimes sharing a system.
    132 
    133 * <//tildeverse.org/> -
    134   Tildeverse - Association of like-minded ~tilde communities.
    135 
    136 * <//suckless.org/> -
    137   Suckless - software that sucks less.
    138 
    139 * <//2f30.org/> -
    140   2f30 - div by 0: made with strange alien technology
    141 
    142 * <//bitreich.org/> -
    143   HTTP serves companies, Gopher serves people.
    144 
    145 * <//dataswamp.org/> -
    146   Remote shell for a few people.
    147 
    148 * <//grifon.fr/> -
    149   Associative ISP around Rennes, Brittany, France.
    150 
    151 People
    152 ------
    153 People from above and others.
    154 
    155 * <https://pc.textmod.es/> -
    156   where ascii art packs get released
    157 
    158 * <https://xero.nu/> -
    159   also see 0w.nz
    160 
    161 * <https://www.swordarmor.fr/> -
    162   French celt (and viking (and celt again)) legends soaked geek lair
    163 
    164 * <https://z3bra.org/> -
    165   Heavy tinkering intensifies...
    166 
    167 Document browsers
    168 -----------------
    169 Most HTTP/HTML browser presented here have a `--dump` flag of some sort,
    170 handful for converting html to mostly readable plain text.
    171 
    172 * <http://retawq.sourceforge.net/> -
    173   Simple text-mode web browser
    174 
    175 * <http://links.twibright.com/> -
    176   Classic text-mode web browser
    177 
    178 * <http://www.elinks.cz/> -
    179   Full-featured text web browser
    180 
    181 * <http://lynx.browser.org/> -
    182   Colorful text web browser
    183 
    184 * <http://w3m.sourceforge.net/> -
    185   Text web browser with a cursor, bells and whistles
    186 
    187 System programming
    188 ------------------
    189 * <http://smarden.org/runit/> -
    190   An init system and supervision suite inspired from daemon tools.
    191 
    192 * <https://skarnet.org/software/> -
    193   Rewrite the layer between the kernel and the applications with minimalism.
    194 
    195 * <https://en.wikipedia.org/Advanced_Programming_in_the_Unix_Environment> -
    196   Programming book for feeling fine with all these syscalls.
    197 
    198 Crypto
    199 ------
    200 * <https://ianix.com/> -
    201   A gold mine of state of the art crypto references.
    202 
    203 * <https://github.com/BLAKE3-team/BLAKE3> -
    204   A hash function that is too good to be real.
    205 
    206 DJB
    207 ---
    208 The elephant in the room of crypto.
    209 
    210 * <https://cr.yp.to/> -
    211   The entry point of its lair.
    212 
    213 * <https://curvecp.org/> -
    214   A (now not so) new style of crypto.
    215 
    216 * <https://dnscurve.org/> -
    217   Standard exploiting curve crypto for dns.
    218 
    219 * <https://pqcrypto.org/> -
    220   The next style of crypto.
    221 
    222 Softwares
    223 ---------
    224 * <https://tinyssh.org/> -
    225   OpenSSH is good, and this one is too and is not as famous.
    226 
    227 * <https://mojzis.com/software/dq/> -
    228   DNSCurve implemented after djbdns from the same author of tinyssh.
    229 
    230 Qmail
    231 -----
    232 An SMTPd server that aims simplicity, security, and general good design.
    233 
    234 * <https://cr.yp.to/qmail.html> -
    235   This is qmail, the venerable alternative to Postfix.
    236 
    237 * <https://notqmail.org/> -
    238   Not qmail, also not netqmail: continuation of both projects.
    239 
    240 * <http://openqmail.org/> -
    241   One-man project similar to notqmail in many aspects.
    242 
    243 * <http://www.memoryhole.net/qmail/#any-to-cname>
    244   Overview of many qmail patches.
    245 
    246 Real time communication
    247 -----------------------
    248 * <http://rtcquickstart.org/>
    249   A really, really good guide that cover simply and accurately SIP and
    250   surrounding protocols, with practical examples.
    251 
    252 * <https://sip5060.net/>
    253   Services and documentation, blog (still very active) about SIP protoco.
    254 
    255 * <http://osmocom.org/>
    256   Foundation for GSM support with free software, including bridging to SIP.
    257 
    258 * <https://ircdocs.horse/>
    259   Status Quo of the IRC protocols actually used.
    260 
    261 * <https://telecom.altanai.com/>
    262   A gold mine for all things about streaming protocols.
    263 
    264 Libraries
    265 ---------
    266 * <https://www.libressl.org/> -
    267   OpenSSL fork with focus on simplicity and sane defaults.
    268 
    269 * <https://man.openbsd.org/tls_init.3> -
    270   Sane alternative interface to the LibreSSL library.
    271 
    272 * <https://openssh.com/> -
    273   You *might* already know this one.
    274 
    275 * <https://bearssl.org/> -
    276   A single-person TLS library.
    277 
    278 Wire protocols
    279 --------------
    280 * <https://dnscurve.io/> -
    281   A better DNSSEC without the bulk, currently used on that site.
    282 
    283 * <https://cr.yp.to/tcpip/minimalt-20130522.pdf> -
    284   A better TLS without the bulk.
    285 
    286 Messages formats/protocols
    287 --------------------------
    288 * <http://www.aaronsw.com/2002/rss30> -
    289   RSS 3.0, which might never see any wide adoption because of backward
    290   compatibility matters to corporate people, but still a good example on how
    291   to simplify a format.
    292 
    293 Networking
    294 ----------
    295 * <https://www.torproject.org/> -
    296   The famous Onion Router
    297 
    298 * <https://geti2p.net/en/comparison/tor> -
    299   Invisible Internet Project, like Tor, but not Tor.
    300 
    301 * <https://freenetproject.org/> -
    302   Alternative internet featuring freedom and anonymity.
    303 
    304 * <http://brokestream.com/netboot.html> -
    305   1 file, 2 functions, 300 lines DHCP and TFTP server!
    306 
    307 * <https://code.kryo.se/iodine/> -
    308   Make all traffic go through DNS to bypass filtering.
    309 
    310 * <https://www.roesen.org/files/ipv6_cheat_sheet.pdf> -
    311   IPv6 cheat sheet.
    312 
    313 * <https://stackoverflow.com/questions/14388706/how-do-so-reuseaddr-and-so-reuseport-differ#14388707>
    314   Semantics of SO_REUSEADDR and SO_REUSEPORT.
    315 
    316 Infrastructure status
    317 ---------------------
    318 * <https://crt.sh/> -
    319   Status monitor for certificates.
    320 
    321 * <https://hwaddress.com/> -
    322   OUI table query, could be a simple script though.
    323 
    324 * <https://repology.org/> -
    325   Software package status for different operating system distributions.
    326 
    327 User interfaces
    328 ---------------
    329 * <https://arcan-fe.com/about/> -
    330   The arcan display server project.
    331 
    332 Documentation
    333 -------------
    334 * <https://manpages.bsd.lv/> -
    335   I learned how to write (mdoc) man pages thanks to the layout of this page.
    336 
    337 Low-Level
    338 ---------
    339 * <https://github.com/cirosantilli/x86-bare-metal-examples> -
    340   Dozens of minimal operating systems to learn x86 system programming
    341 
    342 * <https://bob.cs.sonoma.edu/IntroCompOrg-x64/book.html> -
    343   Learn X86-64 assembly as well as how computer works in general.
    344 
    345 * <https://www.coreboot.org/images/6/6c/LBCar.pdf> -
    346   Use CPU cache as random access memory to write bootloader components in C.
    347 
    348 * <https://yin.neocities.org/pc1512/> -
    349   Giving a new birth to hardware born before me.
    350 
    351 * <http://www.valachnet.cz/lvanek/diy/rc2014/index.html>
    352   Z80 is simple enough so that skilled engineer can peice it back together from
    353   pieces and program most parts.